Training

As of 2016, we have hosted 45 training institutes which have trained over 700 educators worldwide.

The Institute is a comprehensive seven-day, 60-hour intensive training program that covers everything necessary to develop a course in the Inside-Out model: curriculum development, setting parameters, institutional relationships, group dynamics, interactive pedagogical approaches, and much more. Three or more of the days provide an opportunity to learn this transformative educational method through observation, hands-on experience, dialogue, and engagement with an Inside-Out Think Tank, a working group of inside and outside alumni, who have years of experience in the Inside-Out methodology. Training will be followed by consultation to assist in on-site program development. Visit our video page and our training testimonials page to learn more. Scroll down to our FAQ section for answers to many of your questions.

The 2017 Inside-Out Instructor Training Institute Dates:


Training Institute FAQs

Q: Is it possible to commute to the training?
A: Yes, but be advised that training days can be quite long, with both early morning and evening activities.

Q: I am not a higher education instructor. Can I still benefit from the training?
A: Yes. The Inside-Out Training Institutes are open to anyone. Persons in corrections and higher education administration are particularly welcome. However, be advised that much of the content of the training is geared toward higher ed instructors who wish to teach Inside-Out courses.

Q: How can I pay for the training?
A: It is possible to pay with credit cards, checks, or money orders. If you have any questions, please contact eilene.frierson@temple.edu.

Q: When are payments due?
A: Tuition and lodging fees are expected to be paid in full prior to attending the training. If that is not possible, participants will be required to pay all fees no more than 60 days after attending a training.


Inside-Out Training at Pendle Hill
Inside-Out Training at Pendle Hill, July 2016
“The amount of practical information that I have gained is overwhelming, but that is not the most valuable thing. Over the course of this week, particularly when we visited Graterford, I rediscovered a part of me that I haven’t seen in 25 years or so. I’m surprised at the emotional turmoil it has generated. But I also feel like I have found a community that I did not know existed. It is a gift to be surrounded by people who understand what I am saying when I talk about prisons…people that I don’t have to explain everything to. And the training has stirred up an intellectual excitement that I have not felt in years.”
(Instructor Reflection on Training)