2019 Training Facilitators

Wade Deisman

Wade Deisman
Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Wade studied at the University of Alberta (B.A.), Dalhousie University (M.A.), and Carleton University (Ph.D.). Before completing his Ph.D., he worked for the Mayor’s Task Force on Safer Cities in Edmonton, the Atlantic Institute of Criminology in Halifax, and Law Commission of Canada in Ottawa. His research interests range from an unabashed fascination with all things theoretical to a more substantive focus on policing, law, technology, and security. Since 2004, Wade has been the Director of the Ottawa-based National Security Working Group (NSWG). He has conducted research for the RCMP and the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, as well as developing web-based learning materials for Pearson Education. Wade is a frequent media commentator and a strong proponent of community-oriented forms of education and intellectual engagement.


Joanne Falvai

Joanne Falvai
Vancouver Island University

Joanne Falvai has been a faculty member in the Department of Criminology at Vancouver Island University, located in Nanaimo, British Columbia since 2001. Joanne’s teaching and research interests include evidence-based correctional policy, re-entry, the social construction of crime, public misconceptions about crime, crime and the media, and specifically, the laws, politics, treatment and construction of the "drug problem.” Joanne has been facilitating Inside-Out courses at the Nanaimo Correctional Centre (NCC) for the past three years. Her current course is entitled, Social Exclusion: Exploring Diversity, Stigma and Marginalization. In 2017, the Inside-Out program at VIU and NCC was nominated and then selected as a finalist for a Premier’s Innovation and Excellence Award in the Partnership category. Joanne’s experiences teaching Inside-Out, coupled with her ongoing exploration of Indigenous ways of knowing and being, have caused her to re-think all of the courses she teaches. These influences are transforming her teaching style and experiences with students in ways that align with both her professional and spiritual self.


Jeri Kirby

Jeri Kirby
Fairmont State University

Jeri is an assistant professor of criminal justice at Fairmont State University in West Virginia. She earned a B.A. and M.A. from West Virginia University. She has taught Inside-Out courses for several years at the Federal Correctional Institution in Hazelton.



Tessa Hicks Peterson

Tessa Hicks Peterson
Pitzer College

Tessa Hicks Peterson is also the Assistant Vice President of Community Engagement at Pitzer College, director of the Community Engagement Center, director of the Office for Consortial Academic Collaboration, director of CASA (Critical Action & Social Advocacy - local community hub and academic engagement program) as well as an Associate Professor of Urban Studies. Before coming to Pitzer in 2006, Tessa worked for almost a decade as a program director with a number of leading civil rights and social justice organizations in Los Angeles. She has a Masters and PhD in Cultural Studies from Claremont Graduate University and a BA in Psychology from UC Santa Cruz. Tessa’s teaching and scholarship center on community-based education and research, social change theories and movements, decolonization and indigenous knowledge and prison education and abolition. Tessa enjoys bringing diverse groups together for collaborative projects that build community and foster personal and systemic change.


Lori Pompa

Lori Pompa
Temple University

Lori Pompa has been going into prisons for more than 30 years and has taken thousands of students (and others) into correctional facilities through a variety of courses and exchanges during that time. She has been on the Criminal Justice faculty at Temple University since 1992, and is Founder and Executive Director of The Inside-Out Center at Temple University, International Headquarters of The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, which she began as a single class in 1997. As a 2003 Soros Justice Senior Fellow, Lori collaborated with others on both sides of the prison wall to develop Inside-Out into an international model of transformative pedagogy.

Over the past 14 years, 827 college and university instructors from throughout the U.S. and several other countries have taken part in the Inside-Out Training Institute, of which 52 have been held to date. She has co-facilitated each of those trainings. Hundreds of Inside-Out classes have been offered so far, involving more than 30,000 inside (incarcerated) and outside (campus-based) students. Lori regularly speaks about Inside-Out’s history and contributions, most notably at the Clinton School of Public Service, at the Fetzer Institute’s Global Gathering on Love and Forgiveness in Assisi, Italy, at the University of Sydney in Australia, and at Durham University in the U.K.


Ella Turenne

Ella Turenne
Occidental College

Ella is an artist, activist and educator. Currently, she is Assistant Dean for Community Engagement at Occidental College, where she works with students, faculty, staff and community partners to engage in social justice projects in Los Angeles. Ella’s work has been published in various anthologies including Letters from Young Activists: Today’s Rebels Speak Out, Check the Rhyme: An Anthology of Female Poets and Emcees (nominated for a 2007 NAACP Image Award), Woman’s Work: The Short Stories, and most recently in Turning Teaching Inside Out. She is the editor of a volume of visual art and poetry commemorating the Haitian revolution entitled revolution|revolisyon|révolution 1804-2004: An Artistic Commemoration of the Haitian Revolution. Ella is also a filmmaker whose work has been an official selection of various national film festivals including the Hollywood Black Film Festival and the Montréal International Haitian Film Festival, where her short film Woodshed was nominated for Best Short Film. In response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Ella co-edited a volume of poetry on Haiti called For the Crowns of Your Heads; the funds raised were used to aid a library that was destroyed in Port-au-Prince. As an activist, she is on the Executive Steering Committee of the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program and an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. She was also a member of the BLACKOUT Arts Collective where she participated in Lyrics on Lockdown, a national tour where she performed and facilitated workshops educating communities about the prison-industrial complex. She was also co-founder of SistaPAC Productions, whose mission is to develop original creative works from women of color.


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“I will seriously examine the process involved in my own teaching and how I approach it. I need to think more about having the courage to ‘let go’ a little more. I think that the inside students may have a powerful effect on outside students by humanizing issues (substantive) and the educational process. More aware of the differences in how men and women communicate and bond, and I’ll think more about this particularly as an educator. I’m encouraged that a genuine college course can be done inside.”

(Inside-Out Instructor, reflecting on the weeklong training)


“…I now understand why... the type of subject taught is irrelevant. That is, while the academic material is important, it is not about conveying the information to the students. Rather, it is about getting students to unfold and create, first, a relationship with themselves. By doing so, that is when students will have the ability to connect with both themselves and others on a deeper level, which is why the academic subject is irrelevant. Essentially, what I will take from this training is that despite how scholarly or academically knowledgeable I may be, it is not my job to push my achievements and knowledge of my specialty toward the students. I am only there to facilitate that deeper human connection, and that is essential.”

(Inside-Out Instructor, reflecting on the weeklong training)